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Thursday
Jun162011

Using Wee Wee Pads with a Puppy or Adult Dog

Wee wee pads are one of those products that you only think of if you have a) a puppy that needs to be house trained / house broken or b) an older dog that is starting to have incontinence problems. While neither stage of the dog aging life-cyle is one that is particularly easy on your house, the use of dog pee pads can help protect your flooring while helping to train your dog what areas are appropriate for urgent urination.

Puppies

Puppy Wee Wee padsIn regards to puppies, wee wee pads are a great way to teach your growing pup where to urinate so that if you are not able to catch him before he has an accident in the house, there is one protected spot he can go without hurting your floors. As your puppy gets the hang of using a wee wee pad, you can start moving the pad closer and closer to the door. Pretty soon, you can move the dog pee pad outside, and your dog will be potty trained! I didn't know about these pads when I was house training my pup - I think the pads would have saved a lot of carpet cleaner, paper towels, and frustration!

Our vet, Dr. Brown, has some step-by-step tips on how to get your puppy used to a pee pad, in addition to the steps out-lined above for using a dog pee pad as a house training tool:

Adult & Senior Dogs

Helping Incontinent DogsAs much as I hear about wee wee pads being used for puppies, I had not thought about them being used for incontinent dogs until my dog-in-law, Guin, starting aging and having some bladder problems. Common among spayed dogs, incontinence can occur when your female dog begins aging. Unfortunately, you never know if the urination problems will occur, when they might occur, or how frequently they will occur. In Guin’s case, wee wee pads are used during the day as a supplement to her regular outdoor visits. At night, she wears a doggie diaper, just to help prevent any potential night-time accidents. When Guin was first introduced to wee wee pads, she was given the adult wee wee pads for her training. She would use the pad maybe 1 out of 3 times when she had an incident. She is a dignified old lady, and we joked that she dis-liked having a pee pad. The reason we joked was Adult Wee Wee Padsbecause the 2 times she didn’t use the pad, she went right next to it. To prevent this kind of initial resistance, something that might help train your older dog to use wee wee pads is to start out with the puppy version. The puppy wee wee pads have a special attractant to teach young pups to use the pad. If it works with the youngsters, I figure it has to work with the older dogs. Once your older dog learns to use a pee pad with attractant, you can switch over to the adult version, if you see fit.

View more articles written by Kristen Sydelko.

Reader Comments (12)

My Chia, a 14-year old Pomeranian was trained to use pads from puppyhood. Now she has problems with her limbs and is not steady on the pads; the surface s too slippery. Are the adult pads less slippery? Is there a product that is less slippery? Sadly, she flops around on the pad and tries so hard to be good, but it's difficult and heartbreaking to see her struggle. Any ideas??
Many thanks.

October 13, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterAndrea Scola

Got China two months ago, terrier dachshund mix (high legs) and she needs to use the pee pee pads. She refuses. Shes 4 1/2. Is it too late? I have the ones with the attractant but she just looks at it. Its pouring, shes too little and had pneumonia when the shelter found her. I dont want to take her out. How do I get her to use the pads?

November 22, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterLinda, China's mommy!

Hi Andrea, I just read your comment, and certainly feel your frustration as ourt pets are our children and we hate to see them struggle! I had the idea that you could buy a square of artificial turf which some people train their dogs to go on in apartments with a tray under them, (then they just rinse them off to clean). How about putting the turf down (with a rubber anti-slip rug pad under if needed), and then put the pee pad on top? I would think the rough grass like surface would keep the pad in place. Or maybe just the anti-slip pad under, or maybe even just scotch tape the edges of the pee pad to the tile or vinyl floor? Good luck!

November 26, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterJana

there are pee wee pads that have tape on them so they stick to the floor they work really good at not moving around

February 14, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterjacki

I have tried to train my dogs to use the wee wee pads since they were puppies and now at a year and a half I have given up! They think the wee wee pads are toys and they get chewed up all over the house.

October 9, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterAmber

Hi Amber

Thanks for your post. Sometimes, dogs do have problems with chewing on the wee wee pads. If you know there are certain times your dog MUST use the potty, you could put the pads down and put the dogs on them only during that time. For example, immediately after my dog eats (and, I do mean IMMEDIATELY), he goes outside. If I were to train him to use pee pads, I would put him on the pee pad at that time until he did his business. Once the dogs know what the pad is for, they *should* stop chewing on them.

Good luck!
Kristen

October 10, 2012 | Registered CommenterKristen Sydelko

I have a 3 month old yoorkie poo that i have been using pee pads..She knows what they are, but all of a sudden she has been going potty in the floor.. WHY?? I get so upset because she was doing so good.She still uses the pee pads but is also going potty in the floor.

April 9, 2013 | Unregistered Commenterkatina

I cant get my jack russell female to use the wee wee pads I adopted her about 4 months ago( I also have A female pit bull no problems with her) she has ruined my carpet and she know she is not suppose to go in the house she just turned 1 she has bladder problems so I want to give her the option if she can't make it out side to use the wee wee pad I've tried she dosen't seem to cartch on PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!!

April 25, 2013 | Unregistered Commenterlisa saunders

I have a 14 year old shih tzu mix that I found on the street about a year and half ago. Just recently in the past couple months he has begun to tinkle in his sleep... It's really unfortunate considering he sleeps in the bed. We take him out right before we go to sleep, but the little guy just can't seem to make it. We bought puppy pads hoping that would help but he won't use them. Even if we set him on there right when we wake up. Should we just give up and go to doggie diapers?

May 2, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterElizabeth

Hi Elizabeth - Dogs do not inherently use wee wee pads, especially if they have been trained to go outdoors. If you put some time into training him, he could potentially use them. I would suggest working on the training aspect, just in case he starts to have incontinent problems when he is awake. At night, I would use doggie diapers, since he probably does not have the bladder control to get out of bed to use the pads. In using both products, your senior pup will be covered for any time of day that he cannot make it outside. Good luck!

May 3, 2013 | Registered CommenterKristen Sydelko

Hi Lisa - Unfortunately, it is going to take time and training to get your Jack Russell to use wee wee pads. If you start to see her go, get her to a wee wee pad. If you know where she typically goes in the house, put wee wee pads in those locations. Make sure you are using a really good stain remover/odor remover so that she is not tempted to go in the same spots, as well. And, you might have to try diapers. It is never easy to train a dog with bladder issues, but it can be done. It just takes patience, some extra careful watching, and knowing the different signs your puppy makes right before she is about to urinate.

May 3, 2013 | Registered CommenterKristen Sydelko

Hi Katina - It is a good sign that your puppy is still using the wee wee pads, at least! I would suggest a) using a really good stain/odor remover to clean the areas she has gone on the floor and b) watch to see if there are any particular areas that your puppy prefers to use over other spots and put the wee wee pads in those places. Outside, dogs like to choose their own urination spots for some reason or another. It is probably the case indoors, as well. If one of her "favorite" spots is not ideal for your household, using an odor remover and potentially a boundary spray might work. However, the best way to prevent accidents on your floor is to put wee wee pads where your dog thinks in the best spot.

May 3, 2013 | Registered CommenterKristen Sydelko

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