Aquarium Adventures: the Development of the Wet/Dry Filter

Once upon a time we only had access to rather primitive forms of filtration for the marine aquarium. Undergravel filters were usually the filter of choice. This required the use of crushed coral or dolomite for the substrate, since sand would be too fine to work with the undergravel filter. These filters were excellent biological filters and did a fairly good job at mechanical filtration.

Recommended Aquarium Size: How Accurate is a Manufacturer’s Filter Rating?

When shopping for a filter for your new aquarium, or when looking for a replacement filter for the one already on your tank, you are likely to notice nearly every one of the boxes you read will have “recommended for aquariums size XX to XX gallons” in addition to all of the additional helpful point of sale items provided on the packaging by the manufacturer.

Fishkeeping 101: Using Wet/Dry Filters In Your Aquarium

Perhaps no filter has been more closely associated with the development of a “new” style of aquarium as the wet/dry filter is to the mini-reef aquarium. Before the advent of the wet/dry filter, hobbyists had little success in keeping the more demanding coral and anemone species. Introduced in the late 1970’s, the wet/dry filter instantly increased the chance of success.

Fishkeeping 101: Aquarium Filtration Basics

If you wish to become a successful aquarium hobbyist and to keep your fish alive and healthy, it is important that you understand the basics of aquarium filtration. The home aquarium is a “closed system,” which means that any wastes produced will remain in the same body of water until some type of filtration removes or neutralizes the wastes.If you wish to become a successful aquarium hobbyist and to keep your fish alive and healthy, it is important that you understand the basics of aquarium filtration.

Fishkeeping 101: Standard Canister Filters

Canister filters offer several features and benefits to the aquarium hobbyist. Most are designed to be placed below the aquarium on the floor or inside the cabinet stand of the aquarium set-up. This provides an “out-of-sight”, essentially silent operation, perfect for the living room or bedroom aquarium.